This short video takes the viewer from the (now shut) tunnels at Galley’s Gill, Sunderland to take in Wearmouth Bridge and Gill Footbridge. From these tunnels emerged coal brought north from Hetton Colliery on the first steam powered railway line in the world (1822).

Children and adults involved in the Lost Landscapes and Learning were asked to provide words to best describe what they understood by the phrase “Lost landscape”, particularly in relation to the site at Galley’s Gill, Sunderland. The responses were myriad and gave an insight into local perceptions of the area. Click here for a short…

Covering a relatively small area of a few hundred square metres, its location on the steep rising south banks of one of the North East of Englands principal waterways has witnessed considerable land use change over the last millennia, and provides valuable insight into the social, industrial and environmental events in Sunderland from even earlier…

We are so grateful to one of our volunteers David Miller for giving us freely of his time and expertise to help showcase something of the hidden beauty at Galley’s Gill. Enjoy the short video taken one pleasant summer evening in June 2018.

This delightful short film shows the earlier wooden Gill Bridge, prior to the one still standing today. The commentator appears to refer to “Gillford” bridge…something not substantiated in the historical records but nonethless worth exploring. The current Gill bridge can be seen below.

At the end of 1854 a new burial ground was created at Galley’s Gill. The following excerpt can be found on the Sitelines website, Tyne and Wear’s Historic Environment RecordĀ  http://www.twsitelines.info/SMR/5010 Tyne and Wear HER(5010): Bishopwearmouth, Rector’s Gill Cemetery – Details Corder, writing probably in the immediate post-war period adds: “it only remains to add…

“What is Galley’s Gill?” “Where is it?” “Why has it been given different names on different maps through the ages?” These are some of the questions we explored using videos, maps, photos and anecdotes from local residents.    

We got plenty of “liquid sunshine” for our field trip to Rainton Meadows to meet the Durham Wildlife Trust team and take our first steps at navigating and making sense of a landscape, including all the amazing wildflowers and the reasons for their curious names! We had the opportunity to try out our new skills…

Our first task was to use aerial maps of our school to work out where best to create a wildflower meadow. We then marked the spots that we liked and compared our choices with our classmates. We were fortunate to (mostly!) all agree on the strip of barren earth along the edge of our play…

At the start of our 2017/18 Spring Term we were delighted to help launch the pilot project Lost Landscapes and Learning in our home city of Sunderland! We began with an Assembly that took us on a journey through time along the banks of our River Wear! We learned that so much of our landscape…

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